Inspiration

3rd Week of April Construction Update!

3rd Week of April Construction Update!

The last two weeks we have installed the steel structure and the hollow core concrete planks. It took us about one week to install and detail all of the steel. We used the large Crane on site to set steel. A few days later we received 15 truckloads of concrete planks. These planks are used to spanned the distance from the North side of the building to the South side and make up your floor system. I have attached several pictures showing the progress. We are presently installing the underground plumbing in the lower level of the facility. We will continue to back fill the basement walls up to grade starting this Friday the 18th. Within the next couple of weeks we will start to frame the exterior walls of the building.

Untitled design

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Reflection for Holy Week: Do not take any of this for granted.

Reflection for Holy Week:  Do not take any of this for granted.

“I, the Lord, have called you for the victory of justice; I have grasped you by the hand; I formed you, and set you as a covenant of the people, a light for the nations, to open the eyes of the blind and to bring out prisoners from confinement, and from the dungeon, those who live in darkness.”     Isaiah 42:6-8

Today we begin our journey with the Lord Jesus to Calvary.  This then is the time we should unite our “cross” with His.  Every one of us has a cross to bear.  There are no exceptions.  And as we bear our cross we can either complain or lessen our burden by placing it with The Lord this week.  We are aware of His outcome—the glorious fulfillment of all prophecies that His cross would result in the freedom of the body and spirit with His resurrection.

We are no different than Jesus.  We can expect as well as He did the suffering, humiliation and trials of bearing our own cross.  Yet we know we too will be set free and overcome, first of all the death of our sins and, second, of our own ultimate resurrection with Him for all eternity.

There is, to be sure, enough food for thought and prayer this week.  Do not take any of this for granted.  It will indeed all come to pass.

 

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Present Moment Reflection for the Sixth Week of Lent

Present Moment Reflection for the  Sixth Week of Lent

Every day we have 24 hours at our disposition.
That’s all the time we need to readjust a life; to construct happiness,
to serve society, to collect what is positive;
to place ourselves before God, to listen to him, to accept him.
Then, we too, will rejoice at His word: This day you will be with me in Paradise.

From: The Present Moment by Fr. Louis-Marie Parent

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Present Moment Reflection for the Fifth Week of Lent

Present Moment Reflection for the  Fifth Week of Lent

Instead of wasting my time questioning myself, filling myself with doubts, having sentiments of guilt about the past or making plans for an uncertain future, I will endeavor to live intensely the present moment.
by accomplishing positive valuable actions.

 From: The Present Moment by Fr. Louis-Marie Parent

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Present Moment Reflection for the Fourth Week of Lent

Present Moment Reflection for the  Fourth Week of Lent

If a person wants to repair the past,
they must put perfection into the present moment.
Each day they must seek cheerfulness with the same energy as a bee,
who flies enormous distances to collect the pollen
that it transforms into delicious honey.

 From: The Present Moment by Fr. Louis-Marie Parent

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Present Moment Reflection for the Third Week of Lent

Present Moment Reflection for the Third Week of Lent

The present moment is given to us to create marvels.

A perfect today influences an unknown tomorrow and

repairs yesterday’s deficiencies.

God so limited human beings that they can control only the present moment.

From: The Present Moment by Fr. Louis-Marie Parent

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Third Week of Lent

Third Week of Lent

[A woman came to a well.  Jesus said to her,] “Those who drink this water will get thirsty again, but those who drink the water that I will give them will never be thirsty again. . . .”  “Sir,” the woman said, “give me that water!”

John 4: 13-15

This scene is both simple and dramatic.  Jesus encounters a Samaritan woman at a well where He was sitting.  He asked her for a drink of water, a simple but human need.  Jesus knew what her state was which led, little by little, to her recognizing Jesus as the prophet Savior she had been looking for throughout her life.

The fact here, it seems to me, is that we too must come to Jesus on “empty.”  Only in our emptiness can we be filled with what The Lord wishes to give us.  On “empty” we have foregone pride, ego, self-centeredness.  It is really only in such a state that The Lord can fill us with His gifts.

What must I leave behind today in order to be filled with the gifts that God wishes to give me?  Needy is good if it drives me to God.

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Treatment Center Construction Update

Treatment Center Construction Update

We have approximately 50% of the lower level exterior walls poured and 95% of the lower level footing poured. We are presently waterproofing the East portion of the lower level walls and starting to back fill. The lower level wall forms are being installed for the balance of the lower level walls. Thank  you all for your support!

Gh Construction

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Present Moment Reflection for the Second Week of Lent

I must conclude that my mood and my humor
are dependent  more on me than on others.
In reality, the present moment, lived in a positive spirit
makes me a happy person and as time passes I will notice
that my serene attitude is the measure of my happiness and of my influence.

From: The Present Moment by Fr. Louis-Marie Parent

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NATIONAL CATHOLIC SISTERS WEEK

NATIONAL CATHOLIC SISTERS WEEK

First National Catholic Sisters Week Launches

The inaugural National Catholic Sisters Week (NCSW) will launch March 8-14, 2014, at St. Catherine University in St. Paul, Minn., as a part of Women’s History Month. The celebratory week seeks to honor Catholic sisters’ contributions both past and present. It will also bring together young college-age women and women religious to build relationships and foster a better understanding of a vocation that is often misunderstood.

Kick-off events for NCSW include a panel discussion entitled “Sister Stories: How Did I Know?” hosted by broadcast journalist Soledad O’Brien followed by a Eucharistic celebration in St. Catherine’s Our Lady of Victory Chapel. Other events will aim to engage college age women in discussions about religious life and the use of social media to promote personal women religious narratives and information about the vocation. Students from St. Catherine’s will participate by gathering oral histories from sisters. The work will create relationships among sisters and college-age students and preserve the unique stories and
contributions of many sisters.

The NCSW is the first project of a larger three-year effort called Sister Story, an initiative made possible by a partnership between St. Catherine University and the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation. To learn more about the mission of National Catholic Sisters Week and Sister Story view this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oMCgdQTTdsk

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Present Moment Thought of this First week of Lent

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Addiction, Recovery and Hope at Guest House for Clergy and Religious

Many thanks to Randy Hain and The Integrated Catholic Life along with Eileen Homire, our dedicated Atlanta friend, for coordinating the excellent interview  below, with Archbishop Gregory.

In the secular world we frequently hear of drug and alcohol addiction affecting almost every segment of society.  Nobody seems to be immune from this scourge.  However, we don’t often hear about how addiction sometimes affects our Clergy and Religious.  These men and women of the Church face pressures and stress that many of us seldom see or appreciate.

What happens if they become overwhelmed by these challenges and seek relief in alcohol or drugs?

How can we help them come to grips with their addictions, find healing and return to active ministry?

Looking for answers to these questions, I sought out an interview with Archbishop Wilton Gregory of the Archdiocese of Atlanta.

Archbishop  Gregory is hosting two educational workshops in his Archdiocese next month on April 1st (Spanish Track) and April 2nd (English Track) at the Cathedral of Christ the King in Atlanta, Georgia. Both tracks are open to parishioners, counselors, social workers and therapists interested in learning more.  The workshops will include sessions on:

  • Steps for Spiritual Living,
  • Establishing a Parish Substance Abuse Ministry,
  • Addiction and the Older Adult,
  • Internet Addiction, and
  • Addiction and Prevention for Older Youth.

For more information on the workshops, please visit the National Catholic Council on Addictions website: nccatoday.org/ and  nccatoday.org/calendar-2/.


Archbishop Gregory, thank you for taking time out of your busy schedule to be interviewed for Integrated Catholic Life.

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Beautiful Lenten Reflections from Fr. George

Beautiful Lenten Reflections from Fr. George

Today we share this beautiful and inspiring downloadable filled with Lenten Reflections from Fr. George Hazler.

View and Download Free Lenten Reflections Booklet Here

 

 

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Preparation for the Season of Lent

Preparation for the Season of Lent

Jesus’ preaching and His miracles were the trumpets of a new era.  They were the “signs” of a new day.  Jesus healed the blind, but behind this miracle was a deeper meaning.  It was a “sign” to all people to open their eyes to His works.  Jesus opened the ears of the deaf.  It, too, was a “sign” to all people to open their ears to His words.  Jesus forgave sinners.  Again, His forgiveness was a “sign” to all people to turn from sin and begin living new lives.

Jesus set in motion the “Kingdom of God.”  And what was this kingdom?  It was a new era in which love would replace indifference, light would replace darkness, and life would replace death.  But the “Kingdom of Satan” would not yield to the “Kingdom of God” without a battle.  It is this battle that we focus on during Lent.

Fast from bitterness;

Feast on kindness.

Fast from impatience;

Feast on calmness.

Fast from laziness;

Feast on diligence.

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Reflection for Sixth Week in Ordinary Time

Reflection for Sixth Week in Ordinary Time

“Do not think that I have come to abolish the law and the prophets.  I have come, not to abolish them, but to fulfill them.”   Matthew 5:vs17

How many times have we heard around the tables of AA that “I have worked the first three steps but cannot seem to get on with the rest of the steps.”  Well, there is a similarity between this situation and those of people in Jesus’ time.  The people sometimes complained that Jesus was circumventing the Mosaic law by His teaching and healings.  He made it abundantly clear that He wasn’t disposing of their laws but rather was fulfilling them.  On another occasion, Jesus said of some Scribes and Pharisees that they utter fine words, even wise words, but their hearts were far from God.

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Where Is God?

Where Is God?

“Let us go off by ourselves to some place where we will be alone and you can rest a while.”  Mark 6:31

From our earliest years we have been taught and know intuitively that God is everywhere.  But for me, there is a special place I go to every day where I can be alone with my God.  It has become a wonderful sacred space where I can fully be myself and fully present to my God.

My guess is that others have a prayer space they have set apart for their interchange with their God.  It does seem natural and it does seem a very necessary component in life, amid all the ups and downs of our journey.

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How Much Do I Want To Reap?

How Much Do I Want To Reap?

The challenge presented to us today is found in the parable of the seed as found in Mark’s account of The Lord talking to a huge crowd gathered around Him as He sat in a boat on the water while the people remained on the shore nearby.

Jesus said:  “Listen carefully to this.  A farmer went out sowing.  Some of what he sowed landed on the footpath where the birds came along and ate it.  Some of the seed landed on rocky ground where it had little soil; it sprouted immediately because the soil had no depth.  Then, when the sun rose and scorched it, it began to wither for lack of roots.  Again, some landed among thorns, which grew up and choked it off, and there was no yield of grain.  Some seed, finally, landed on good soil and yielded grain that sprang up to produce at a rate of thirty and sixty and a hundredfold.”    [Mark 4:3-9]

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Reflection for Second Week in Ordinary Time

Reflection for Second Week in Ordinary Time

“Some people brought a paralytic to Jesus to be healed. Seeing how much faith they had, Jesus said to the paralyzed man, ‘My son, your sins are forgiven.’ At once the man was healed.” Mark 2:5

What one of us, when in the throes of our alcoholic addiction, reached the dire point of wanting to be healed? How did we act? The following true story, not unlike many of our own stories, was given to me from a fellow Jesuit, Fr. Mark Link, S.J.

Harold Hughes described himself as “a drunk, a liar, and a cheat.” He was so convinced he’d never change that he decided to end it all. At the last moment, however, he remembered enough from the Bible to realize that to take one’s life is wrong. So he knelt down sobbing and explained to God why he was going to end it all. Suddenly, something happened that he never experienced before in his life.

He wrote later: “God was reaching down and touching me. Like a stricken child lost in a storm, I suddenly stumbled into the warm hands of my Father. Joy filled me, so intense it seemed to burst my breast.” Ten years later, Harold Hughes was elected governor of Iowa.

When did I, perhaps feel God “touching me?” Today would be a good day to reflect on this and give thanks to God for saving me. As we know, many alcoholics take their own life while others continue drinking, ensuring a slow suicide.

 These thoughts offered by Brother Richard Hittle, S.J., a grateful 1980 graduate of Guest House and an employee since 2004.

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Guest House Appoints New “VP of Development”

Guest House Appoints New “VP of Development”

Tied to Guest House’s bold moves to consolidate its U.S. Operations in the State of Michigan, and build new and upgraded treatment facilities in Lake Orion, MI, Guest House is restructuring its fund raising operations and preparing for a national fund raising campaign to fund construction and innovation.

All ongoing fund raising operations at Guest House will now be led by Erika H. Walker of Rochester Hills, MI formerly Director of Major and Planned Gifts at the Children’s Hospital of Michigan Foundation at the Detroit Medical Center.

Erika Walker is a senior-level fundraising executive with 16 years of non-profit experience managing capital campaigns, major and planned gifts, annual giving, grant development, donor communications, volunteer management, strategic planning, prospect management/strategy, stewardship, conference/event planning, and leadership of teams. She is experienced in the use of Talisma, the identical donor database in use at Guest House.

Former VP of Advancement and Outreach, Richard Kramer, is moving to the role of Senior Campaign Advisor within the Development Department to focus 100% of his attention on the upcoming ten million dollar “Vision 20/20” Capital Campaign which will supplement the three to four million dollars of annual fundraising achieved annually at Guest House in support of its clinical operations.

Please welcome Erika Walker to her new leadership role at Guest House.

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Reflection to begin Ordinary Time In the Church Year

Reflection to begin Ordinary Time  In the Church Year

On January 13, 2014, our Church began what is termed “Ordinary Time” in the Liturgical calendar. Most of us in recovery can or have done something extraordinary in ordinary time. We are sober, productive members of society, happy to be alive – giving glory to God and help to our neighbors.

Zane Grey, famous author of Western novels, practiced dentistry in New York before becoming a full-time writer. One of his earliest literary attempts was called Riders of the Purple Sage. After reviewing it, a New York publisher called it junk and told him to quit writing and stick with filling teeth. Grey took it to another publisher, who bought it and parlayed it into a million copies.

In similar scenarios, Louisa May Alcott, celebrated author of Little Women, led an early life of dire poverty. Actress Lucille Ball was paralyzed in a car accident and never expected to walk again.

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